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  • Borovicka

    I just wanted to take a moment to thank you both. I took my EMT-B course almost concurrently with Ron and your podcast was inspirational and invaluable to me. You have credit for helping me make it through. Passed my state written and practicals last week. It would’ve been much more difficult without you.

  • Hawkmeadow

    I enjoy your podcasts very much. I too came into EMS later in life, passed my EMT-B in December 2009 and have applied to Paramedic program beginning Aug 2011 (require 1 year as EMT here before attending Paramedic school). Currently run with 4 different squads in an effort to learn and absorb as much as possible before paramedic school. Thanks again-very informative and gives a little comic relief to my long days.

  • Hey there chaps!

    Just thought I would formally congratulate Ron on his success in his EMT-B, and congratulate the both of you on what is becoming one of my must listen to podcasts.

    I have already started passing details of the podcast round to everyone who will listen!

    One final thing though, this is far from just being useful for ‘EMS Newbies’ I have learned many a new thing to add to my assessment skills by listening to the two of you discuss various issues, my favourite of which has to be the auscultation of long bone fractures.

    Thanks for doing this podcast, it really and truly is a valuable resource.

  • Anonymous

    Thanks Mark. Of course I haven’t passed my NR test yet, but I’ll get there.

    I’m thinking I’m going to do some special episodes where I interview people other than Kelly about advice for new EMTs. It would be interesting to talk to you about how people become EMTs/Paramedics in the UK and what advice you’d give them. I’ll send you an email.

  • Anonymous

    Glad to hear it helped.

  • Anonymous

    “I too came into EMS later in life…”

    I wonder how much difference it makes doing this a little older rather than right out of high school. I think those intangible interpersonal qualities that make good medics are something you generally have when you are little older.

  • I would be honoured to take part Ron, although I dont think I could quite come up to Kellys standards!

    Drop me an email and we can arrange something.

    Mark