Ep 7 Shock & Scenarios

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[audio:07_ShockScenarios.mp3] (47:35) This week Ron confesses to making his wife an EMS widow already but at least he got out of doing P90X. Hear the story about how half of Ron’s team got killed during his extraction day scenarios. His scenarios included sucking chest wounds, ejected infants, and belligerent drunk drivers distracting Ron. Kelly also tells us a lot about various kinds of shock including one that makes people faint at the toilet.

We answer two listener questions: “Does the Trendelenburg position help hypotensive patients?” from Vince DiGiulio and “What malpractice insurance would an EMT need?” from Dan Pelzel.

Since we finished talking about Kelly’s book last week we talk about his post “Why y’all looking at me like I’m the douchebag?”

During the gear section Kelly answers “What gear do you carry on the ambulance that you don’t use in the hospital?”

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  • Ray Smith

    Ron, if you are a dedicated reader of Kelly’s blog I an the infamous Husband-In-Law. With that being said I listened to last weeks pod cast and wanted to inform you that Channelview Fire Dept. is a volunteer service that I know several of the members of. When you get done with your ride time, and if you would be interested I could talk to them and maybe you could do some volunteer time with them. Being the Asst. Chief over medical at my home town fire dept. and the only nationally and state registered EMT on the dept. I can honestly say that I’m sure you would be welcomed with open arms there, Because people that want to help just for the sake of helping are few and far between. If you would like me to assist you in this manner just e-mail me @ apsoemt247@yahoo.com.
    RaySmith NREMT-B 1625880

  • Ray Smith

    Ron, if you are a dedicated reader of Kelly’s blog I an the infamous Husband-In-Law. With that being said I listened to last weeks pod cast and wanted to inform you that Channelview Fire Dept. is a volunteer service that I know several of the members of. When you get done with your ride time, and if you would be interested I could talk to them and maybe you could do some volunteer time with them. Being the Asst. Chief over medical at my home town fire dept. and the only nationally and state registered EMT on the dept. I can honestly say that I’m sure you would be welcomed with open arms there, Because people that want to help just for the sake of helping are few and far between. If you would like me to assist you in this manner just e-mail me @ apsoemt247@yahoo.com.
    RaySmith NREMT-B 1625880

  • Ron

    Ray, thanks for the offer on Channelview. That’s a ways from me, I’m on the North side of Houston. There is one agency right next door that takes volunteers, so should be able to find a place. Also both of the places I’m doing clinicals are close enough.

  • Ron

    Ray, thanks for the offer on Channelview. That’s a ways from me, I’m on the North side of Houston. There is one agency right next door that takes volunteers, so should be able to find a place. Also both of the places I’m doing clinicals are close enough.

  • Cameron

    Hey I like your podcasts, but i heard you mention that clinicals for medics in Texas are 240 hrs? That seems incredibly short, here in Colorado we have 240 hrs in hospital, then 500 hrs of field rides. The hospital hours are split between different specialties such as 2 shifts at L&D, 2 with respiratory therapy, 2 at OR (intubation practice) 2 ICU, 1 Telemetry, 1 Triage, 6 ER, 3 at Children s Hospital Denver, 1 at a Mental health hospital. I’m sure there’s more. It is interesting to see the difference between states and standards.

  • Cameron

    Hey I like your podcasts, but i heard you mention that clinicals for medics in Texas are 240 hrs? That seems incredibly short, here in Colorado we have 240 hrs in hospital, then 500 hrs of field rides. The hospital hours are split between different specialties such as 2 shifts at L&D, 2 with respiratory therapy, 2 at OR (intubation practice) 2 ICU, 1 Telemetry, 1 Triage, 6 ER, 3 at Children s Hospital Denver, 1 at a Mental health hospital. I’m sure there’s more. It is interesting to see the difference between states and standards.

  • Ron

    The 240 is only the last semester of the paramedic program. I don’t have the details on how it is broken down, but I know there are rotations through the different hospital departments. That may be in the fall semester.

    My school thinks of the whole two years as a paramedic program and you can test for intermediate after the first year if you want. Total clinical hours in the 2 year program is 512. Which would still be considerably less than in Colorado.

  • Ron

    The 240 is only the last semester of the paramedic program. I don’t have the details on how it is broken down, but I know there are rotations through the different hospital departments. That may be in the fall semester.

    My school thinks of the whole two years as a paramedic program and you can test for intermediate after the first year if you want. Total clinical hours in the 2 year program is 512. Which would still be considerably less than in Colorado.

  • Scott

    Ron/Kelly,
    I am an Advanced Life Support Paramedic in Victoria (Australia), my role is as what is called a ‘program coordinator’ for our electronic Patient Care Record System. My role includes a huge amount of time teaching students about PCR documentation. Soooooo many of the things that you guys talk about are the same here. Sooo much of the advice is the advise i was given as a student and is still advise that I/we give to new students.

    I have only just started listening to your pod cast, so have spend the last couple of weeks catching up on the back log. But I have been spotted, more than once, driving from one appointment to another chuckling away to my self as I listen.

    Keep up the great work. Ron you have clearly already gotten hook on EMS. Never stop learning, you’ll have a great time!

  • Scott

    Ron/Kelly,
    I am an Advanced Life Support Paramedic in Victoria (Australia), my role is as what is called a ‘program coordinator’ for our electronic Patient Care Record System. My role includes a huge amount of time teaching students about PCR documentation. Soooooo many of the things that you guys talk about are the same here. Sooo much of the advice is the advise i was given as a student and is still advise that I/we give to new students.

    I have only just started listening to your pod cast, so have spend the last couple of weeks catching up on the back log. But I have been spotted, more than once, driving from one appointment to another chuckling away to my self as I listen.

    Keep up the great work. Ron you have clearly already gotten hook on EMS. Never stop learning, you’ll have a great time!