Ep 1 – Newbie EMT Fears

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[audio:01_EMT_Newbie_Fears.mp3] (49:05)
Our first episode, recorded the morning before Ron’s first EMT-Basic class. We talk about the fears he has before he ever gets started and Kelly – his Jedi master paramedic – calms those fears with ease.

Those fears are:
#1 I’ll have too weak a stomach to be an EMT.
#2 I’m not emotionally strong enough for it.
#3 I won’t be smart enough.

Other things we cover:
What are good and bad motivations for becoming an EMT? Stories including chicken and horse guts. We get Kelly’s opinion on CISM and the calls that haunt him. As well as how he think you should for studying for class.

Every episode we will also talk about Kelly’s book. This week you’ll learn everything about it and some of the hardcore paramedic stuff the editors thought to dangerous to include.

Lastly we start our section on the Gear a Newbie Really needs. Kelly brings it down to 3 things

  1. A Pen
  2. A Watch
  3. A Stethoscope

Mentioned:
Ron’s Photography site and podcast, Photographer And Model
Kelly’s book En Route

Correction
Ron’s class is actually 12 weeks long and also has 2 5 hour extrication labs.

Definitions:
Critical Care Paramedic – Primarily deals with high acuity patient transfer.
Acuity – from acute; how sick the patient is. The higher the acuity the worst sick they are.
CISM – Critical Incident Stress Management.

Download MP3

  • Ron

    We were having a little problem with permlinks and comments, so Aarron the Truck Driver commented on my personal blog. I fixed the blog problem (I think) but I thought you’d all like the answer, so I’m posting and answering the comment here.

    “You guys have a really decent show! It is kind of unusual to be learning so much from a pod cast. Did the truck driver live? The one who got blasted off the tanker with the chicken guts in it – from the first episode you guys did. I was also curious why a blood pressure reading has two numbers, like “seventy over eighty”. A tuck/car has one needle inside the oil pressure gauge, not two. What do those numbers mean?

    ~Aaron”

    The reason you have two numbers is you have to pressures. The first number is the pressure when the heart pumps and the second is the pressure when the heart relaxes, or between the pumps. When the heart squeezes it pushes blood through the tubes and that is a high pressure, when the push is over and the heart is refilling, there is still pressure in the arteries, and that is the second number.

    I don’t know if the guys lived, I’ll ask Kelly to comment.

  • Ron

    We were having a little problem with permlinks and comments, so Aarron the Truck Driver commented on my personal blog. I fixed the blog problem (I think) but I thought you’d all like the answer, so I’m posting and answering the comment here.

    “You guys have a really decent show! It is kind of unusual to be learning so much from a pod cast. Did the truck driver live? The one who got blasted off the tanker with the chicken guts in it – from the first episode you guys did. I was also curious why a blood pressure reading has two numbers, like “seventy over eighty”. A tuck/car has one needle inside the oil pressure gauge, not two. What do those numbers mean?

    ~Aaron”

    The reason you have two numbers is you have to pressures. The first number is the pressure when the heart pumps and the second is the pressure when the heart relaxes, or between the pumps. When the heart squeezes it pushes blood through the tubes and that is a high pressure, when the push is over and the heart is refilling, there is still pressure in the arteries, and that is the second number.

    I don’t know if the guys lived, I’ll ask Kelly to comment.

  • Ahh, i see.
    What do the individual number signify? I would imagine it is a version of PSI, pounds per square inch or something like that. I hope im not being annoying..
    What are the limits of both sides, How high, how low can they be? How wide can the gap be between the two?

    I want am thinking about installing an oil gauge to my arm! With two needles.

  • Ahh, i see.
    What do the individual number signify? I would imagine it is a version of PSI, pounds per square inch or something like that. I hope im not being annoying..
    What are the limits of both sides, How high, how low can they be? How wide can the gap be between the two?

    I want am thinking about installing an oil gauge to my arm! With two needles.

  • Ron

    BP is measured in millimeteres of mercury (mm Hg). To quote my book, “Early blood pressure gauges contained a column of mercury and a linear scale that was graduated in millimeters. Even though different gauges are used today, the blood pressure is still measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg).”

    The docs keep changing what is normal, but right now for adults is is 90 to 140 for the top number. We aren’t give a number for the bottom, and were told in some cases it can “go all the way down”. Meaning you can hear the pulse even when there is no pressure in the cuff.

  • Ron

    BP is measured in millimeteres of mercury (mm Hg). To quote my book, “Early blood pressure gauges contained a column of mercury and a linear scale that was graduated in millimeters. Even though different gauges are used today, the blood pressure is still measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg).”

    The docs keep changing what is normal, but right now for adults is is 90 to 140 for the top number. We aren’t give a number for the bottom, and were told in some cases it can “go all the way down”. Meaning you can hear the pulse even when there is no pressure in the cuff.

  • Michellecomeslast

    Love the show, how do I download these older episodes? Thanks, Michelle

  • Michelle:

    You can download the individual MP3’s here on the site on the post for
    each episode. I’ve been meaning to make one page that has a link for
    each episode to make it easier, but haven’t had the time.

    Ron